Setting Direction for Your Community

Understanding members’ problems, needs, and goals is essentially to facilitating a thriving community. Building a successful, thriving community—whether it be an Enterprise Transition Community, community of practice or temporary, project-focused community—requires understanding the problems, needs and goals of the community members. For example, when we started the IBM Scrum Community, we asked team members, “What is the greatest challenge you’re experiencing in relation to embracing Scrum?” The top answer was that community members were having difficulty using Scrum as distributed teams. Most teams had members located in different cities, countries and…

Elizabeth Woodward, Principal Consultant

Elizabeth Woodward is the CEO of Woodward Innovations, Inc., helping organizations around the world to optimize their performance. She has coached and consulted with C-suite executives and VPs of Fortune 500 companies, development, marketing, learning, HR, IP Law and others in complex environments, across enterprise hierarchies and pillars, to improve by using evidence-based, measurable approaches. Lean and Agile Transformation Consultant Her largest agile transformation effort to date has involved more than 65,000 software development team members, their managers and executives in more than 30 countries. The effort resulted in an…

Practical Guide to Distributed Scrum

A Practical Guide to Distributed Scrum offers an unprecedented view into how distributed teams can successfully implement and use Scrum, the leading framework for agile software development. With tips, experiences and recommendations from over 1,084 agile team members from 30 countries, readers have access to a wealth of techniques that can maximize the potential of their globally-distributed teams. Early in the development process, the IBM QSE Agile Community decided to donate all royalties to charitable organizations. They voted on the following charities to benefit from these efforts.  Children’s Hunger Alzheimer’s…

Stone Soup Approach to Communities of Practice

Stone Soup as a key to successful communities of practice The story of Stone Soup is one that exists in many cultures, and it’s one that I learned as a child. This story, I believe, speaks to the core principles of running an effective volunteer project—including successful communities. A long time ago, a kind traveler came upon a poor village filled with many unhappy people. The traveler smiled and asked why they were so unhappy. The villagers told him it was because there was no food to eat and they…

Solving Problems through Communities

Connect community members who can solve the problems or address the needs. Once a community knows what the big problems are and have rank-ordered them, they can begin dealing with the items of greatest value to the community.  For cross-corporate communities, good facilitators connect existing and potential community members from all over the world—across those corporate boundaries, geographic boundaries, time zone boundaries and so on—who are passionate about solving the problem and bring them together virtually.  They decentralize authority. They enable the success of community members by providing important resources such as…

Communities for Continuous Improvement

Communities can be a powerful asset for change Communities, given support, nurturing and social technology, can become a center of powerful influence that creates connections and enables continuous improvement within the enterprise through armies of volunteers. Large-scale enterprises have diverse talent and skills to tap One of the most exciting and powerful aspects of being part of a large-scale enterprise is having access to diverse talent and skills throughout the company. Within those enterprises that have invested in a good corporate-wide directory service with reasonable search functionality, finding subject matter experts…

2014 Bosnia Agile Kickoff

Published on May 6, 2014 This session is from the Bosnia Agile Community kickoff, 2014. The focus is on the evolution of Agile and agility as it relates to DevOps and beyond. Intro to the Session Agile development is a mature, mainstream approach to software delivery today. Agile Maturity Research respondents indicate that 78% of development team members have now worked on at least one agile project, 25% report they are extremely experienced with agile, and 81% of teams surveyed have more than one year of experience with agile methods….